THE PRODUCE SECTION
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THE PRODUCE SECTION

THE PRODUCE SECTION

Two brothers from the city of Toronto, who have grown together with the same mindset and the same love for music, experienced hip-hop and all its technical aspects at tender young ages. Playing with vinyl and recording with pause tapes as early as 6 and 8 years old, the authenticity shown today was bred in them from the beginning. With a newly modeled industry here and continuing on the horizon, Prince Buzz and Chin Beats, collectively known as The Produce Section, hope to balance the spectrums of hip-hop with classic, precise, signature, but relevant music.

In 2009, the duo devised a beneficial, but daunting plan to flood the Internet, colleges, universities and subway stations with a series of instrumental albums (known to the hip hop world as ‘beat tapes’), a fairly new form of digesting hip-hop music pioneered by the likes of Pete Rock, J Dilla, and DJ Premier. Over the span of 8 months, 11 instrumental albums were created; all with themes, stories, and a vintage signature sound to carry the premise through. The last of the series was a remix album titled “Growing Up Sucks, Vol. 2”, pairing acapellas from classic hip-hop songs with their fitting, yet unique production. The work and progression of this process led to a full-fledged production team, holding shows at The Toronto Center for the arts an entire summer with jazz musician Ron Westray (also Oscar Peterson Chair and professor at York University, former Atlantic Records jazz artist), then branching out to the United States and abroad for the next three years.

Signed solely as a production duo to Band Camp Records, an independent record label owned by Queens, NY rapper Consequence (former member of A Tribe Called Quest and Kanye West’s G.O.O.D. Music imprint) to gain placements and be at the production helm for his next projects. Through those releases, they secured opportunities to work with the likes of Estelle, Busta Rhymes, Q-Tip, Mobb Deep, Large Professor, Elzhi from Slum Village, Little Brother, Killer Mike, Fred Da Godson, Inspectah Deck and much more. They also produced a one-time rap single for actor Pooch Hall (The Game, Ray Donavan, Jumping The Broom) called “Something Light” which also featured rapper Consequence. It was presented as a new joint on 106 and Park on Rocsi’s last episode, which then went on to secure the #8 spot on the national show’s daily countdown. From there, they went on to produce background music for VH1’s “Love and Hip Hop NY”, and score music for XBOX’s version of MLB 2K13: The Show, and got the attention of legendary hip-hop producer DJ Premier during their work in the States producing underground records.

After years of honing one side of the craft, making a bit of a name for themselves as producers, they have both decided to devote more time to the art of the lyricist. Buzz developed the moniker of Prince Buzz, presenting an entirely new sound of rap music with his new release, Procrastination, filled with hard-hitting rhymes, and a stark contrast of smooth, vintage, throwback production. Chin Beats, will also be producing and writing his own upcoming street album, Turn Your Computer Off, and are currently promoting their fresh and new released instrumental album, Rhyme Gold. These will serve as benchmarks of relentless material to be released in the near future and years to come. With projects consisting of both beat tapes and street albums, the brotherly duo aim to brand themselves as both unique, signature beatmakers as well as brash, stand out wordsmiths, doubling up their creative duties in what has already become a highly competitive genre.

Though their sound has been tested in the world of urban music (Hot 97, Power 105, Power 106 LA), they still in this day and age take on the risk of being avant-garde artists and the task of being individuals creatively in a genre still seeking a creative balance. A team more about pushing the culture forward and maintaining the essence of music they once grew up on. Taking a grassroots approach with a style of hip-hop not incredibly of the norm today, The Produce Section can only hope to improve on their work and stand out more in a sea of carbon copy material. Dope is dope at the end of the day. Once the sound has been digested by the listener, one can only help but wonder; it’s hard to find a lot of people still doing this today.